Patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis struggle with treatment-related toxicity and frequent relapse1-5

The traditional standard of care—including chronic use of glucocorticoids—can lead to significant toxicity
and frequent relapse1-5

To achieve remission of ANCA-associated vasculitis, patients are often treated with immunosuppressive agents and high doses of glucocorticoids.
Glucocorticoid dosages are typically reduced once remission is achieved, but even then, they can lead to side effects that significantly impact
patients, including1,2:

Acne iconAcne6
Striae iconStriae6
Hirsutism iconHirsutism6
Buffalo Hump iconBuffalo
hump6
Supraclavicular fat pad iconSupraclavicular
fat pad6
Thrush iconThrush6
Diabetes iconDiabetes1
Weight gain iconWeight gain1
Icon representing 60%

Approximately 60% of patient
mortality within the first year
has historically been attributed to
treatment-related adverse events,
not active vasculitis.7

Patients remain trapped by the challenges of life with—and treatment
of—ANCA-associated vasculitis1

A hypothetical male patient

I will always be nervous about going backward instead of forward.”


Ron, 61*
Diagnosed with MPA 4 years ago and currently experiencing his 2nd major relapse

    Background
  • Initial presentation = joint pain, fatigue, fever, numbness in extremities, and proteinuria
  • Past induction regimen = rituximab + prednisone
  • eGFR = 43.6 mL/min/1.73 m2
  • Urinary albumin:creatinine ratio = 125
A hypothetical female patient

What used to be an everyday action, like getting up from a chair or walking up the stairs, has become a struggle.”


Nina, 59*
Newly diagnosed with GPA and has yet to start induction therapy

    Background
  • Initial presentation = dysuria, shortness of breath, fatigue, and cough
  • eGFR = 46.3 mL/min/1.73 m2
  • Urinary albumin:creatinine ratio = 128

*Hypothetical patient.
eGFR, estimated glomerular filtration rate.

Historically, up to 50% of patients experience relapse, which is associated
with
an increase in
damage
due to the
disease itself
and
treatment.1

How would you treat
patients with a
presentation similar to
Ron’s or Nina’s?

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INDICATION

TAVNEOS (avacopan) is indicated as an adjunctive treatment of adult patients with severe active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (granulomatosis with polyangiitis [GPA] and microscopic polyangiitis [MPA]) in combination with standard therapy including glucocorticoids. TAVNEOS does not eliminate glucocorticoid use.

Important Safety Information

CONTRAINDICATIONs

Serious hypersensitivity to avacopan or to any of the excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hepatotoxicity: Serious cases of hepatic injury have been observed in patients taking TAVNEOS, including life-threatening events. Obtain liver test panel before initiating TAVNEOS, every 4 weeks after start of therapy for 6 months and as clinically indicated thereafter. Monitor patients closely for hepatic adverse reactions, and consider pausing or discontinuing treatment as clinically indicated (refer to section 5.1 of the Prescribing Information). TAVNEOS is not recommended for patients with active, untreated, and/or uncontrolled chronic liver disease (e.g., chronic active hepatitis B, untreated hepatitis C, uncontrolled autoimmune hepatitis) and cirrhosis. Consider the risks and benefits before administering this drug to a patient with liver disease.

Serious Hypersensitivity Reactions: Cases of angioedema occurred in a clinical trial, including 1 serious event requiring hospitalization. Discontinue immediately if angioedema occurs and manage accordingly. TAVNEOS must not be readministered unless another cause has been established.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Reactivation: Hepatitis B reactivation, including life-threatening hepatitis B, was observed in the clinical program. Screen patients for HBV. For patients with evidence of prior infection, consult with physicians with expertise in HBV and monitor during TAVNEOS therapy and for 6 months following. If patients develop HBV reactivation, immediately discontinue TAVNEOS and concomitant therapies associated with HBV reactivation, and consult with experts before resuming.

Serious Infections: Serious infections, including fatal infections, have been reported in patients receiving TAVNEOS. The most common serious infections reported in the TAVNEOS group were pneumonia and urinary tract infections. Avoid use of TAVNEOS in patients with active, serious infection, including localized infections. Consider the risks and benefits before initiating TAVNEOS in patients with chronic infection, at increased risk of infection, or who have been to places where certain infections are common.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common adverse reactions (≥5% of patients and higher in the TAVNEOS group vs. prednisone group) were nausea, headache, hypertension, diarrhea, vomiting, rash, fatigue, upper abdominal pain, dizziness, blood creatinine increased, and paresthesia.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Avoid coadministration of TAVNEOS with strong and moderate CYP3A4 enzyme inducers. Reduce TAVNEOS dose when coadministered with strong CYP3A4 enzyme inhibitors to 30 mg once daily. Monitor for adverse reactions and consider dose reduction of certain sensitive CYP3A4 substrates.

TAVNEOS is available as a 10 mg capsule.

Please see Full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for TAVNEOS.

To report a suspected adverse event, call 1-833-828-6367. You may report to the FDA directly by visiting www.fda.gov/medwatch or calling 1-800-332-1088.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Serious hypersensitivity to avacopan or to any of the excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

INDICATION

TAVNEOS (avacopan) is indicated as an adjunctive treatment of adult patients with severe active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (granulomatosis with polyangiitis [GPA] and microscopic polyangiitis [MPA]) in combination with standard therapy including glucocorticoids. TAVNEOS does not eliminate glucocorticoid use.

INDICATION

TAVNEOS (avacopan) is indicated as an adjunctive treatment of adult patients with severe active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (granulomatosis with polyangiitis [GPA] and microscopic polyangiitis [MPA]) in combination with standard therapy including glucocorticoids. TAVNEOS does not eliminate glucocorticoid use.

INDICATION

TAVNEOS (avacopan) is indicated as an adjunctive treatment of adult patients with severe active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (granulomatosis with polyangiitis [GPA] and microscopic polyangiitis [MPA]) in combination with standard therapy including glucocorticoids. TAVNEOS does not eliminate glucocorticoid use.

Important Safety Information

CONTRAINDICATIONs

Serious hypersensitivity to avacopan or to any of the excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hepatotoxicity: Serious cases of hepatic injury have been observed in patients taking TAVNEOS, including life-threatening events. Obtain liver test panel before initiating TAVNEOS, every 4 weeks after start of therapy for 6 months and as clinically indicated thereafter. Monitor patients closely for hepatic adverse reactions, and consider pausing or discontinuing treatment as clinically indicated (refer to section 5.1 of the Prescribing Information). TAVNEOS is not recommended for patients with active, untreated, and/or uncontrolled chronic liver disease (e.g., chronic active hepatitis B, untreated hepatitis C, uncontrolled autoimmune hepatitis) and cirrhosis. Consider the risks and benefits before administering this drug to a patient with liver disease.

Serious Hypersensitivity Reactions: Cases of angioedema occurred in a clinical trial, including 1 serious event requiring hospitalization. Discontinue immediately if angioedema occurs and manage accordingly. TAVNEOS must not be readministered unless another cause has been established.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Reactivation: Hepatitis B reactivation, including life-threatening hepatitis B, was observed in the clinical program. Screen patients for HBV. For patients with evidence of prior infection, consult with physicians with expertise in HBV and monitor during TAVNEOS therapy and for 6 months following. If patients develop HBV reactivation, immediately discontinue TAVNEOS and concomitant therapies associated with HBV reactivation, and consult with experts before resuming.

Serious Infections: Serious infections, including fatal infections, have been reported in patients receiving TAVNEOS. The most common serious infections reported in the TAVNEOS group were pneumonia and urinary tract infections. Avoid use of TAVNEOS in patients with active, serious infection, including localized infections. Consider the risks and benefits before initiating TAVNEOS in patients with chronic infection, at increased risk of infection, or who have been to places where certain infections are common.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common adverse reactions (≥5% of patients and higher in the TAVNEOS group vs. prednisone group) were nausea, headache, hypertension, diarrhea, vomiting, rash, fatigue, upper abdominal pain, dizziness, blood creatinine increased, and paresthesia.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Avoid coadministration of TAVNEOS with strong and moderate CYP3A4 enzyme inducers. Reduce TAVNEOS dose when coadministered with strong CYP3A4 enzyme inhibitors to 30 mg once daily. Monitor for adverse reactions and consider dose reduction of certain sensitive CYP3A4 substrates.

TAVNEOS is available as a 10 mg capsule.

Please see Full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for TAVNEOS.

To report a suspected adverse event, call 1-833-828-6367. You may report to the FDA directly by visiting www.fda.gov/medwatch or calling 1-800-332-1088.

References: 1. King C, Harper L, Little M. The complications of vasculitis and its treatment. Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2018;32(1):125-136. doi:10.1016/j.berh.2018.07.009 2. Jennette JC, Nachman PH. ANCA glomerulonephritis and vasculitis. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2017;12(10):1680-1691. doi:10.2215/CJN.02500317 3. Guillevin L, Pagnoux C, Karras A, et al. Rituximab versus azathioprine for maintenance in ANCA-associated vasculitis. N Engl J Med. 2014;371(19):1771-1780. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1404231 4. Stone JH, Merkel PA, Spiera R, et al. Rituximab versus cyclophosphamide for ANCA-associated vasculitis. N Engl J Med. 2010;363(3):221-232. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa0909905 5. Specks U, Merkel PA, Seo P, et al. Efficacy of remission-induction regimens for ANCA-associated vasculitis. N Engl J Med. 2013;369(5):417-427. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1213277 6. Yasir M, Goyal A, Bansal P, et al. Corticosteroid adverse effects. StatPearls [Internet]. Accessed May 5, 2021. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK531462 7. Little MA, Nightingale P, Verburgh CA, et al. Early mortality in systemic vasculitis: relative contribution of adverse events and active vasculitis. Ann Rheum Dis. 2010;69(6):1036-1043. doi:10.1136/ard.2009.109389